Carnegie Mellon University

Seminars

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering invites prestigious colleagues to speak during weekly Graduate Seminars. All talks take place from 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Please see below for venue details.

 For questions, please contact the committee chair, Swarun Kumar.


 

Graduate Seminars

All seminars will take place in the Robert Mehrabian Collaborative Innovation Center, Pahther Hollow Room. Refreshments are served at 11:30 a.m.

View all previously recorded seminars here. Andrew ID and password are required to view recorded seminars.

Assistant Professor
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
Arizona State University

Watch the seminar

Abstract

Gallium nitride (GaN) based wide bandgap (WBG) materials are revolutionizing an increasing number of applications ranging from applied electronics such as LEDs and lasers, power electronics, RF and power ICs, to quantum information such as quantum photonics and quantum sensing. For example, GaN WBG devices are presently making a significant impact on power electronic devices technologies, which are vital for electric vehicles, data centers, and smart grids. The new power devices based on GaN are expected to outperform the current Si power devices, with promises to trim the losses in power conversion circuits, trip the size, weight and cost of power systems, and overall, drive a 10 percent reduction in global power consumption. At the heart of all these exciting applications is the WBG materials, the unique electronic and optical properties of which have enabled and will continue to enable new paradigms in electronic and photonic technologies. In this talk, I will review our progress on GaN materials research, and discuss their device applications in kV-class power transistors, high temperature memory and ICs for space missions, and integrated photonics for quantum information and biomedical sensing applications. Additionally, I will also discuss the research challenges and opportunities of emerging ultra-wide bandgap (UWBG) materials, including Ga2O3, diamond, and AlN, which represent the next frontier in electronic and optical materials.

Bio

Yuji Zhao is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU), where he leads the GaN research efforts at ASU. He received the Ph.D degree from University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) in 2012 under the supervision of Nobel Laureate Professor Shuji Nakamura. Dr. Zhao’s research interests are in the field of wide bandgap materials and devices (e.g., GaN, Ga2O3, diamond) for applications in power electronics, RF and power ICs, and quantum photonics. He has authored/co-authored more than 140 journal and conference publications, 2 book chapters, and over 20 patents. Dr. Zhao is the receipt of 2020 MIT TR 35–China Award, 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, 2017 ASU Fulton Outstanding Assistant Professor Award, 2016 DTRA Young Investigator Award, 2015 NASA Early Career Faculty Award, 2015 SFAz Bisgrove Scholar Faculty Award, and 2010–2013 UCSB SSLEC Outstanding Research Award.

Associate Professor
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Cornell University

Assistant Professor
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
University of Texas at Austin

Assistant Professor
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
University of Michigan

Abstract

The power consumption of flexible electric loads can be coordinated to provide a variety of services to the electric grid to improve grid reliability, economics, and environmental impact. This talk will explore the impact that electric load coordination schemes developed to provide transmission-level services can have on the distribution network, such as under/overvoltages and transformer overheating. We will then describe a variety of load coordination architectures and control strategies that can be used to manage distribution network impacts. In particular, we will discuss the issue of utility-aggregator coordination, where a load aggregator wishes to coordinate electric loads to provide ancillary services but does not know the topology/parameters of the distribution network and the utility wishes to protect their network from negative impacts resulting from the actions of the load aggregator. Simulation-based case studies will demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the various strategies.

Bio

Johanna Mathieu is an assistant professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Prior to joining Michigan in 2014, she was a postdoctoral researcher at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. She completed her PhD at the University of California at Berkeley in 2012. She is the recipient of an NSF CAREER Award and the Ernest and Bettine Distinguished Faculty Award. Her research focuses on ways to reduce the environmental impact, cost, and inefficiency of electric power systems via new operational and control strategies. She is particularly interested in developing new methods to actively engage distributed flexible resources such as energy storage, electric loads, and distributed renewable resources in power system operation, which are especially important in power systems with high penetrations of intermittent renewable energy resources such as wind and solar.

 

Associate Professor
Bioengineering Department
Boston University

*Location change: Posner Hall 146

Associate Professor
Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Massachusetts Institute of Technology