KJLesker Sputtering System

 

 

 

KJLesker Sputtering System

The Lesker sputtering system is a large vacuum chamber where an inert (or reactive) gas atmosphere is introduced along with the generation of a plasma across a target material and substrate.  Sputtering occurs when these gas particles are ionized in an electric field (producing a gas plasma) and then directing them toward the source or target, where the energy of these gas particles physically dislodges, or "sputters off," atoms of the source material.


Description

A sputtering system provides thin film deposition of various metals and insulators using DC or RF plasmas across a substrate.  The Lesker sputtering system contains four 2-inch sputtering guns and has the capability to sputter 15 different metals as well as insulators and semiconductors such as ceramics, silicon, and piezoelectric material.  The
system takes approximately 6-8 hours to pump down before a chamber pressure of 4E-7 Torr is reached, adequate for subsequent deposition.

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Usage Policy

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Contact

Name

Office

Extension

Email

George Lopez

 

 

glopez@cs.cmu.edu

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Qualified Users List

Name

Office

Extension

Email

 

 

 

 

 

etc.

 

 

 

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Standard Operating Procedures

Instructions

 

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Applications Notes

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Useful Links

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Miscellaneous

Sputtering Calibration Tip

Typically when sputtering with the Lesker or Indel you'll want to double

check the sputtering rate and an easy way to do this is with lift-off.>Although lift off with Kapton Tape is quite common, a simpler, more elegant solution was taught to me by Matt Moneck:

 

1. Simply draw a line on the wafer with a Sharpe marker (or photoresist pen).

2. Sputter the wafer as intended.

3. Put the wafer in an acetone ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes to lift off

the sputtered metal over the drawn line. If any of the metal hasn't

lifted off, simply rub it away with an acetone soaked Q-tip.

 

Since the Sharpe comes off with acetone, there's no adhesive residue on

the wafer. Even better, since the Sharpe line is so low, the "bunny

ears" effect seen from lifting the Kapton tape doesn't occur.

 

by Michael Vladimer

Feb. 11th, 2004

 

 

 

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