Indel Evaporation/Sputtering System

Indel Evaporation/Sputtering System


Description

The Indel SS1 is a single source/target vacuum system equipped for either thermal evaporation or DC plasma sputtering. It has a base pressure around 5 uTorr under turbomolecular vacuum. In sputter mode, a single sputter gun is available for 3" targets. The power supply can maintain about 250 watts input power (1A max), and the wafer stage can be spun mechanically for even deposition. 5 mTorr to 20 mTorr are conventional sputter pressures, with argon as the ambient gas. A shutter is also available for pre-sputtering. In thermal evaporation mode, one boat can be loaded for resistive heating up to 50A on the current meter, with a circuit breaker to protect from extreme overheating. The wafer is water cooled on its stage.

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Usage Policy

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Contact

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Qualified Users List

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Standard Operating Procedures

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Application Notes

Sputtering Calibration Tip
Typically when sputtering with the Lesker or Indel you'll want to double check the sputtering rate and an easy way to do this is with lift-off. Although lift off with Kapton Tape is quite common, a simpler, more elegant solution was taught to me by Matt Moneck:
  1. Simply draw a line on the wafer with a Sharpe marker (or photoresist pen).
  2. Sputter the wafer as intended.
  3. Put the wafer in an acetone ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes to lift off the sputtered metal over the drawn line. If any of the metal hasn't lifted off, simply rub it away with an acetone soaked Q-tip.
Since the Sharpe comes off with acetone, there's no adhesive residue on the wafer. Even better, since the Sharpe line is so low, the "bunny ears" effect seen from lifting the Kapton tape doesn't occur.
by Michael Vladimer
Feb. 11th, 2004

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Useful Links

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Miscellaneous

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