External News

 
 
Lines on the face help pick out the twin who dunnit
New Scientist: July 19, 2013
 
 
Are Faces the New Fingerprints?
PBS Newshour - May 29, 2013
Marios Savvides talks about the use of facial recognition software in identifying the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.
 
 
“Hallucinating” a face, new software could have ID’d Boston bomber
Ars Technica: May 29, 2013
Software turns handfuls of pixels into identifiable faces, as NOVA finds.
 
 
Manhunt—Boston Bombers
PBS NOVA - May 29, 2013
Marios Savvides talks about the use of facial recognition software in identifying the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.
 
 
A Face in the Crowd: Say goodbye to anonymity
60 Minutes (CBS): May 20, 2013
 
 
Savvides Talks Facial Recognition Software on CNN
CNN: May 10, 2013
Marios Savvides, director of the CyLab Biometrics Center and associate research professor of electrical and computer engineering, was recently interviewed on CNN about why facial recognition technology failed to identify the suspects of the Boston Marathon bombing. He explains that low-resolution images prevented current technologies from identifying the two individuals, even though there were pictures of both in public databases. Check out the CNN video here, where Savvides discusses research that is looking into ways that people can be identified through facial recognition software even if the picture is at an angle or the quality is low.Savvides Talks Facial Recognition Software on CNN
 
 
Bain Discusses Data Backup on KDKA-TV
KDKA-TV: March 1, 2013
ECE Professor and Associate DSSC Director James Bain has two important messages for the modern computer user: back up your data and plan to move it from time to time if you want it 40 years from now.

ECE Professor and Associate Data Storage Systems Center Director James Bain has two important messages for the modern computer user: back up your data and plan to move it from time to time if you want it 40 years from now.

During a broadcast in February, Bain instructed KDKA-TV's John Shumway and the CBS affiliate's viewers that the best way to preserve important data on your personal computer is to back it up in at least two places, including the cloud.

Bain went on to discuss how much storage a typical user might need and the importance of periodically upgrading your storage as the industry changes. He noted that the version backed up in the cloud is migrated automatically. "They are constantly upgrading their hardware. So behind the scenes, you've got banks of thousands and thousands of hard drives," he said.

"Most of the manufacturers of disc drives will specify that they will last for 10 years. That is their designed lifetime. They don't anticipate that these things are going to be around for 40 years and still readable." he said. "Thus, for copies stored at home, you need to plan to move your data to a new device every five to 10 years"

Click here to check out the entire story, or watch the video below.


 
 
CyLab Researchers Virgil Gligor and David Brumley Receive Honors
CyLab News - February 11, 2013
CyLab Director Virgil Gligor, a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, has been selected as one of five researchers to receive the 2013 Technical Achievement Award. CyLab researcher David Brumley, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, is one of four Carnegie Mellon University faculty members awarded a prestigious 2013 Sloan Research Fellowship.

CyLab Director Virgil Gligor, a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, has been selected as one of five researchers to receive the 2013 Technical Achievement Award. CyLab researcher David Brumley, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, is one of four Carnegie Mellon University faculty members awarded a prestigious 2013 Sloan Research Fellowship.

Virgil Gligor, CyLab Director and Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, been selected as one of five researchers to receive the 2013 IEEE Technical Achievement Award, “for pioneering work and leadership in the area of computer and network security.”

The IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Award is given for outstanding and innovative contributions to the fields of computer and information science and engineering or computer technology, usually within the past 10, and not more than 15, years. Contributions must have significantly promoted technical progress in the field. 

For nearly four decades, Professor Gligor’s research interests have ranged from access control mechanisms, penetration analysis, and denial-of-service protection to cryptographic protocols and applied cryptography. His research addresses problems of trustworthy computing in the presence of an active adversary (e.g., malware, malicious insiders) and next generation secure Internet.

Gligor's previous honors include the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)'s 2011 Outstanding Innovation Award for security and privacy research and the 2006 National Information Security Award for pioneering research in information security (jointly given by National Security Agency and National Institute of Standards and Technology in the US.)

David Brumley, CyLab researcher and assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, is one of four Carnegie Mellon University faculty members awarded a prestigious 2013 Sloan Research Fellowship. They are among 126 scientists and scholars so honored this year by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The Fellowships, which include an award of $50,000 for two years, seek to stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise.

Brumley, who received his PhD from CMU in 2008, is interested in all areas of computer security, applied cryptography, program analysis, compilers, and verification. For some examples of his recent work, visit his research page.