Capturing, Modeling and Leveraging Process Variability

ECE Seminar: Capturing, Modeling and Leveraging Process Variability


Starts at: March 28, 2013 4:30 PM

Ends at: 5:30 PM

Location: Pittsburgh Campus: Scaife Auditorium (Room 125), Refreshments at 4pm. Silicon Valley campus: Rm 118, Building 23 at 1:30 PST

Speaker: Costas J. Spanos

Affiliation: Andrew S. Grove Distinguished Professor, University of California - Berkeley

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Faculty and Students,

If you would like to meet with Costas J. Spanos during his visit to CMU on Thursday, March 28th please email Adam Palko at apalko@andrew.cmu.edu

Details:

Abstract:

While variability has been mostly a cause for concern in the Integrated Circuits community, the focus of this talk is to show that a systematic approach can be very productive in managing, and even leveraging its key attributes. The central idea is that a comprehensive variability model can have several benefits, ranging from parsimonious characterization, to improved metrology and control, and, finally, to optimal IC design tradeoffs at various levels of abstraction. These opportunities will be illustrated through specific examples in process diagnostics, enhanced metrology, generalized “corner” design, and efficient variability propagation during circuit-level simulation.

Bio:
COSTAS J. SPANOS received the EE Diploma from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece in 1980 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in ECE from Carnegie Mellon University in 1981 and 1985, respectively. In 1988 he joined the Faculty at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences of the University of California at Berkeley. He has served as the Director of the Berkeley Microlab, the Associate Dean for Research and as Department Chair. He works in statistical analysis in the design and fabrication of integrated circuits, and on novel sensors and computer-aided techniques in semiconductor manufacturing. He also works on statistical data mining techniques for energy efficiency applications. He has contributed to two successful startup companies, Timbre Tech, (acquired by Tokyo Electron) and OnWafer Technologies (acquired by KLA-Tencor). He is presently Director of the Center for Research in Energy Systems Transformation, and of the Berkeley Educational Alliance for Research in Singapore.